Archive | April 2016

We Need to Stop Eating the Oceans

Exposing the Big Game

Yana Rusinovich Watson

by Captain Paul Watson

For centuries, the oceans have fed humanity. But in the last century, humans has destroyed oceanic eco-systems with an ecological ignorance that is insane.

The fisherman has now become one of the most ecologically destructive occupations on the planet. It’s time to put aside the outdated image of the hardy, independent, and hard-working fisherman working courageously to feed society and support his family.
No longer does the typical fishermen go to sea in dories with lines and small nets. Today’s industrial fishermen operate multi-million dollar vessels equipped with complex and expensive technological gear designed to hunt down and catch every fish they can find.

One manufacturer of electronic fish locators (Rayethon) even boasts that with their product, “the fish can run but they can’t hide.
And for the fish, there is no safe place as poachers hunt them down mercilessly, even in marine…

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The effects of trophy hunting on five of Africa’s iconic wild animal populations in six countries – Analysis – Conservation Action Trust

http://conservationaction.co.za/resources/reports/effects-trophy-hunting-five-africas-iconic-wild-animal-populations-six-countries-analysis/

“The analysis will reveal that trophy hunting is an activity that fuels corruption, it encourages the unfair redistribution of the wealth generated without adequate involvement of communities, causes the loss of healthy individuals that are still key for reproduction and social cohesion and, most damagingly, contributes to the decline of all five species considered in this report.”

The elephant, rhino, leopard, cheetah  and lion are the five African species considered in this report, which refutes a previous report which stated that trophy hunting provided revenue for the country and its communities and aided conservation. Ten years on and this is found to be thoroughly inaccurate.

Inside the lost cave world of the Amazon’s tepui mountains | New Scientist

https://www.newscientist.com/article/2085733-inside-the-lost-cave-world-of-the-amazons-tepui-mountains/?utm_source=NSNS&utm_medium=ILC&utm_campaign=webpush&cmpid=ILC%257CNSNS%257C2016-GLOBAL-webpush-TEPUICAVES

Beautiful, previously hidden cave in the Amazonian mountains.

When I was a child, I dreamed of exploring places like these, of being the first human to find them and then ensuring they remained protected and untouched. I wanted to buy the entirety of the Amazon rainforests and preserve them! I was an idealistic innocent child and believed that all animals and wildlife were at risk of destruction by the bizarrely short-sighted, violent behaviour of humans. I was right. It’s a shame no one did that as rainforests worldwide are being decimated. I hope this place remains safe from tourism and destruction.

Diet key to feeding the world in 2050 without further deforestation, modelling suggests – Science News – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

http://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2016-04-20/diet-key-to-feeding-the-world-in-2050-without-destroying-forests/7339644

I think vegan communities have been saying this for some years now. It’s common sense. It’s absolutely shameful that we are carrying out such horrific levels of deforestation as a result of western obsessions with a meat-based diet. None of this destruction was ever necessary.

Use India as our history lesson – do what is healthy and sustainable. Go vegan!

Getting Real about Palm Oil | Jonathon Porritt

http://www.jonathonporritt.com/blog/getting-real-about-palm-oil

A Jonathon Porritt piece from last year, discussing various initiatives to try to get Palm oil into some sort of organised collaborative state before all of Asia’s forests have been completely destroyed for Palm oil production.

“Suffice it to say, however, that such a convergence is unlikely to have some kind of absolutist ‘zero definition’ at its heart. It’s entirely correct that much of the projected growth in oil palm development does not require any deforestation at all – there’s a lot of degraded and scrubby land (particularly in Indonesia) that has to be the top priority for new planting. And much can be done by helping smallholders to increase their yields – often less than 50% of what can be achieved on the most efficient plantations.”

Radio 4 ‘In Our Time’: Behavioural Ecology

http://bbc.in/12eFsZP

A nice Melvyn Bragg Radio 4 interview from December 2014 discussing Behavioural Ecology and its history with Steve Jones (Professor of Genetics, UCL), Rebecca Kilner (Professor Evolutionary Biology, University of Cambridge), and John Krebs (Professor of Zoology, University of Oxford).

Including: Tim Burgen’s four questions (causation, development, evolutionary history, function/purpose); behaviour as adaptation; fitness/genetic fitness; Richard Dawkins; innate behaviour/ instinctive behaviour; Lehman; natural selection; game theory; analysis of animal behaviour; evolutionary conflict of interests; exploitation of food/foraging; mating success; mating patterns; etc.

#behaviouralecology

How buzzards came to fly over the UK again – BBC News

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-35916515

I’m fascinated by these stunning birds. Their soaring, floating habits and their haunting call always stops me in my tracks and makes me peer up into the sky so that I can admire them from afar. The buzzard is yet another bird of prey previously brought to the brink of extinction in the UK by the hunting/shooting/fishing fraternity because they were deemed detrimental to the entirely unnatural but profitable (to a few) activity of moorland grouse shooting and pheasant shooting. On any relatively sunny day, I see buzzards soaring over my workplace, which is located between agricultural and non-agricultural fields. Two years ago we had a number of pairs of buzzards at this location. This year there is only one pair. There could be many reasons, but it is a rural location right near a farm and I regularly hear a shotgun firing on an afternoon.

I do not want to live in a country where non-native species, bred purely for a barbaric “sport” (who are going to be shot dead in huge numbers anyway, for perverse human enjoyment and greedy profit) are protected by killing our native wildlife. For far too long we have allowed this lunacy to continue unchecked, without criticism or debate. No more.

For any farmer or landowner who says,  “There are too many buzzards”: how many is too many? Too many for what, and for whom? Their numbers will be checked naturally by the food available to them. Leave them alone, along with hen harriers and sea eagles and all of the other avian predators ruthlessly persecuted by people who have the psychotic mentality that they can pick and choose to kill whatever wildlife they see fit with complete disregard for native species and Britain’s ecology.