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Complete Cranium Reveals Otter- and Badger-like Features | Cleveland Museum of Natural History

The new species, Siamogale melilutra lived 6.24 million years ago in the Yunnan Province in China. It weighed approximately 110 lbs and was roughly the size of a modern wolf.”

https://www.cmnh.org/announcements/ancient-otter

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Dolphins escape from Taiji facility in Japan – BBC News

It’s so tragic that these animals are so traumatised and conditioned to rely on handouts for resources that they gain their freedom after someone cut the nets and they don’t know what to do with it. Awful breaking of a wild animal’s autonomous, free spirit.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-38515187

The Toll of Dolphins Under Siege in Taiji | The Huffington Post

Thanks to Huff Post for sharing the plight of Taiji dolphins with its readers. It’s actually six months of every year that the Japanese fishermen commit these heinous crimes against nature and allow greed and ignorance to rule the town of Taiji, Wakayama Prefecture. Half of every year they slaughter dolphins. It should be absolutely illegal to do what they do but instead they get rich from selling those they spare from the butcher’s knife to marine amusement parks around the world. 

Don’t visit dolphin shows. Your ticket funds this massacre in Japan every year. Supply and demand; stop demanding dolphins entertain us, they’ll stop taking them for captivity and killing the rest.

http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/us_586d520be4b068764965c601?timestamp=1483650102083

Exhibition: Dinosaurs of China. Ground Shakers to Feathered Flyers

This exhibition is being held at Wollaton Hall in Nottingham through summer 2017, not far from me, and I am looking forward to visiting! 

http://www.dinosaursofchina.co.uk/

RYOT | The Huffington Post Ivory Burn

http://ryot.huffingtonpost.com/ivory-burn/

Austin Peck, PhD (Biology) and film director writes about the tragic decline of the African elephant at the hands of man, and how we have choices to make. Empathy and action are key to saving Africa’s wilderness.

“Kenya’s Tsavo National Park, for example, is an entire ecosystem the size of Michigan that is itself on the chopping block because it no longer earns money from tourism. Just out of sight from the empty lodge verandas, the bushland is already quickly and quietly becoming grazing land for tens of thousands of cattle owned by businessmen from the capital city. New railways and gas pipelines, funded primarily by China, block elephant migration routes. While unbridled development of the region gallops forward, elephants are increasingly pushed into oblivion, and it is still the black face of the impoverished poacher who is most commonly blamed for the wholesale annihilation of the wild. These are the kinds of choices we make, and the stories those choices require.”

The effects of trophy hunting on five of Africa’s iconic wild animal populations in six countries – Analysis – Conservation Action Trust

http://conservationaction.co.za/resources/reports/effects-trophy-hunting-five-africas-iconic-wild-animal-populations-six-countries-analysis/

“The analysis will reveal that trophy hunting is an activity that fuels corruption, it encourages the unfair redistribution of the wealth generated without adequate involvement of communities, causes the loss of healthy individuals that are still key for reproduction and social cohesion and, most damagingly, contributes to the decline of all five species considered in this report.”

The elephant, rhino, leopard, cheetah  and lion are the five African species considered in this report, which refutes a previous report which stated that trophy hunting provided revenue for the country and its communities and aided conservation. Ten years on and this is found to be thoroughly inaccurate.